Black Isle Brewery


Scotland’s only organic brewery, making world-class beers from the finest organic malt and hops – grown without chemicals – just as nature intended. Come and visit us on our beautiful organic farm, a patch of paradise on The Black Isle. In our fields, we grow malting barley for delicious beer, as well as seasonal vegetables, herbs and salads for our bar in Inverness. We believe in a sustainable cycle on our farm; using the malt from the brewery mash tun to feed our lovely house cow, who gives us fresh milk every day.


Fyrish Monument


The Fyrish Monument is a monument built in 1782 on Fyrish Hill (Cnoc Fhaoighris), in Fyrish in Evanton, near Alness, Easter Ross. It represents the Gate of Negapatam, a port in Madras, India, which General Munro took for the British in 1781. It is visible from almost anywhere in the parishes of Kiltearn and Alness. The site of the monument provides an extensive view over the Cromarty Firth and beyond, and Ben Wyvis can be seen clearly, especially impressive if snow-covered. A path to the top starts at a car park northeast of the hill at OS grid NH627715.

25.8 miles away


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Loch Ness


Loch Ness is a large, deep, freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 kilometres southwest of Inverness. Its surface is 16 metres above sea level. Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoological Loch Ness Monster, also known affectionately as "Nessie".

31.4 miles away


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Culloden Battlefield


Powerfully emotive and atmospheric battlefield where the 1745 Jacobite Rising came to a tragic end Experience the powerful emotions of the Battle of Culloden in the visitor centre’s 360-degree battle immersion theatre, which puts you right in the heart of the action. Discover the true story of the 1745 Rising, from both the Jacobite and Government perspectives, in the newly accredited museum, where unique artefacts from the time are displayed.



Fairy Glen

An easy walk up a delightful wooded glen, with two attractive waterfalls. The Fairy Glen was once the scene of a well-dressing ceremony, where the children of the village decorated a pool, next to a spring, with flowers. This was said to ensure that the fairies kept the water supply clean. The walk is accessible for most walkers, with a clear footpath through and steps an dis near to bus routes that access Rosemarkie.